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Jack Bauer
01-09-07, 12:19 PM
In a partnership with Cingular Wireless, see it here
http://www.apple.com/iphone/

And Apple Computers is officially dropping "Computers" and becoming Apple Inc.

http://www.macworld.com/news/2007/01/09/liveupdate/index.php



The iPhone

"This is a day I've been looking forward to for two and a half years," said Jobs. "Every once in a while a revolutionary product comes along that changes everything."

In 1984, said Jobs, Apple introduced the Macintosh, and changed the computer industry. In 2001, Apple introduced the iPod, and changed the entire music industry.

"Well, today, we're introducing three revolutionary products of this class," said Jobs. "The first one is a widescreen iPod with touch controls. The second is a revolutionary mobile phone. The third is a breakthrough Internet communications device."

"These are not three separate devices," said Jobs. "This is one device. And we are calling it iPhone. Today Apple is going to reinvent the phone."

Jobs explained that smartphones provide phone and e-mail and what he called "the baby Internet. They're not so smart and not so easy to use."

"We don't want to do these," he said. "We want to do a leapfrog product that's way smarter than these phones and much easier to use. So we're going to reinvent the phone."

The iPhone does not use a keyboard, nor does it use a stylus, as many smartphones do today. The device uses new technology called "Multitouch."

"We're going to use the best pointing device in our world," said Jobs. "We're born with 10 of them, our fingers."

Multitouch is far more accurate than any touch display, according to Jobs. It ignores unintended touches, supports multi-fingers gesture. "And boy, have we patented it," he added.

The iPhone runs Mac OS X, said Jobs. "We start with a solid foundation," he explained.

"Why would we run such a sophisticated operating system on a mobile device? It's got everything we need," he said. "It's got multitasking, networking, power management, awesome security and the right apps. It's got all the stuff we want. And it's built right in to iPhone. And has let us create desktop-class applications and networking.

iPhone also synchronizes through iTunes. It syncs media, contact information, calendars, photos, notes, bookmarks, e-mail accounts. "All that stuff can be moved over the iPhone completely automatically," said Jobs.

The iPhone features a 3.5-inch, 160 dot-per-inch color screen. There's a small "Home" button it. It's also remarkably thin -- 11.6 millimeters, thinner than any smartphone out there, according to Jobs.

On one side, the iPhone sports a ring/silent switch, volume up and down controls. On its silver back side is a 2 megapixel digital camera. The bottom features a speaker, microphone and iPod dock connector.

The iPhone also incorporates a proximity sensor that automatically deactivates the screen and turns off the touch sensor when you raise the device to your face. An ambient light sensor will sense lighting conditions and adjust brightness levels accordingly. And an accelerometer can tell when you switch from portrait to landscape mode.

Jobs' demonstration of the iPhone began with iPod-related features. An iPod icon along the bottom of the screen brings up a list of music, and Jobs flicked his finger to scroll up and down. He flipped the iPhone on its side and it reoriented to landscape mode, displaying album art in iTunes' "Cover Flow" mode. Jobs also showed video on the device.

"We want to reinvent the phone," he reiterated. "What's the killer app? The killer app is making calls! It's amazing how hard it is to make calls on phones. We want you to use contacts like never before."

The iPhone can synchronize contacts from a PC or Mac, and features "Visual Voicemail." He described it as "random access voicemail" that lets you navigate directly to the voice messages you're interested in.

iPhone is a quad-band phone that operated on GSM and EDGE networks. That's the most popular international standard, said Jobs, though Apple plans to make 3G phones in the future. It also integrates Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 2.0 connectivity, and will automatically switch from a cell phone data network to Wi-Fi when it gets in range.

Demonstrating the phone's ability to make calls, he touched the screen's phone icon and scrolled through his contact list, pulling up Jonathan Ive, senior vice president of industrial design. Phil Schiller then called Jobs -- visible through call waiting. Jobs pressed a "merge calls" button and then created a three way conference calling.

The iPhone's text messaging interface looks similar to iChat -- user dialogue is encased in bubbles, and a touch keyboard appears below. And the phone's photo management software enables you to use a "pinching" motion to zoom in and out of pictures.

The iPhone's Internet connectivity includes HTML-capable e-mail that works with any IMAP or POP-based e-mail service. Apple has also included its Safari Web browser. Jobs called it the "first fully usable HTML browser on a phone."

The same finger-pinching trick also works with Safari, to zoom in and out of images on Web pages.

Jobs said that Yahoo will offer free "push" e-mail capabilities using IMAP to all Yahoo! Mail users. "When you get a message, it'll push it right out to the phone for you," he said.

The iPhone also supports Dashboard widgets, starting off with weather and stocks.

"This a breakthrough Internet communicator," said Jobs. "It's the Internet in your pocket."

Following Jobs' demonstration of how the iPhone works with Google Maps -- he searched for Starbucks, zoomed in to a location and called, then jokingly ordered 4,000 lattes to go -- Google CEO Eric Schmidt joined him on stage, congratulating Jobs and Apple for the iPhone's introduction.

Schmidt said that the iPhone lets companies like Apple and Google "merge without merging," combining the "brain trust" of Apple's development team and companies like google to create a "seamless environment."

Jerry Yang, co-founder and CEO of Yahoo, expressed similar sentiments, and stated his hope that Yahoo's OneSearch feature will be supported on the iPhone soon. "Just think," said Yang. "It's basically like having a BlackBerry without the Exchange server."

Apple is also introducing accessories for the iPhone, including stereo headphones that include a microphone and switch and a Bluetooth headset.

The iPhone features a battery that lasts for five hours of talk time, video or Web page browsing, or 16 hours of audio playback.

"So what should we price it at?" Jobs mused. The price will be $499 with a two year contract for a 4GB model, or an 8GB model for $599. And it will be released in the United States in June. Jobs said Apple anticipates bringing the iPhone to Europe in the fourth calendar quarter of 2007, and Asia in 2008.

Cingular, the North American cell service provider that has sold iTunes-equipped phones from Motorola, will be Apple's exclusive service partner. "They are the best and most popular network in the country," said Jobs, adding that Cingular worked with Apple to develop the Visual Voicemail technology -- "the first fruit" of their collaboration, which required the development of technology both for the phone and network.

Stan Sigman, CEO of Cingular, joined Jobs on stage and said that his company is pleased to distribute "one of the most eagerly anticipated wireless products ever."

"This is not an MVNO," said Sigman, referring to a Mobile Virtual Network Operation, such as Virgin Wireless, Disney Mobile, Helio and others -- companies that buy bandwidth capacity on cell service provider networks and offer added value, such as exclusive handsets or content. "It's a unique relationship that lets Apple be Apple and Cingular be Cingular."

Jobs showed a slide that estimated the market for phones to be in the vicinity of 957 million units. "In 2008 we are going to try to grab 1 percent marketshare," he said. "We think we're going to have the best product in the world."

Diehard
01-09-07, 12:22 PM
Here's a demo (scroll down). Pretty amazing.

http://www.engadget.com/2007/01/09/live-from-macworld-2007-steve-jobs-keynote/

Sic Em Bears
01-09-07, 01:35 PM
Yes Give Me One Now!!!!!!!!!!!

Solan=Christ!!!
01-09-07, 01:58 PM
This is why I haven't bought a Treo yet...

But they need to liscense with Sprint!

DONNIE D
01-09-07, 02:00 PM
This makes my rotary phone so outdated.

Yogi
01-09-07, 02:47 PM
And Apple Computers is officially dropping "Computers" and becoming Apple Inc.


Didn't the Beatles already try that?

nein51
01-09-07, 02:49 PM
This is why I haven't bought a Treo yet...

But they need to liscense with Sprint!Wont happen in this form. Sprint is on a different network type.

Not sure I understand the clamour. It isnt a first of any sort and the ipod isnt exactly known for its build quality.

Oh yeah, texting on that thing is going to be near impossible.

Sic Em Bears
01-09-07, 02:50 PM
I believe they settled or it was thrown out. It recently went back to court because Apple Computers said it would never go into the music buisness....Apple still says they aren't in the music buisness they are in the digital download buisness....something like that.

macviolinist
01-09-07, 03:01 PM
Apple said they would never produce records, the way apple records produces albums. So far, the computer company hasn't.

Nein, you made a comment about iPods the last time I brought up iPhones. Care to post some linkage?

BUGWBBear
01-09-07, 03:01 PM
Didn't the Beatles already try that?

The Beatles are Apple Corps, Ltd.

Sic Em Bears
01-09-07, 03:04 PM
http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/05/08/apple_vs_beatles/
Apple won....Apple Computers.....

http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/05/08/apple_vs_beatles/
Beatles say they will appeal same day.

SoTexBear
01-09-07, 05:38 PM
Wont happen in this form. Sprint is on a different network type.

Not sure I understand the clamour. It isnt a first of any sort and the ipod isnt exactly known for its build quality.

Oh yeah, texting on that thing is going to be near impossible.

Are you kidding me? Texting is unbelievably fast...moreso than on any keypad previously used.

The ipod nanos (my wife and I have two) are virtually indestructable whereas the ipod video does have a glitch every now and then. The build quality of both is still considered top notch, however.

Have you seen the build quality of a Powerbook? Check out the one I have on ebay! It's a little tank.

nein51
01-09-07, 05:49 PM
Apple said they would never produce records, the way apple records produces albums. So far, the computer company hasn't.

Nein, you made a comment about iPods the last time I brought up iPhones. Care to post some linkage?Why do I have to do your research for you?

http://www.macintouch.com/reliability/ipodfailures.html - Look at some of the reported failure rates...20%, hell even the overall 6% is disgusting but 20 freakin percent??

The failure rate of the batteries is so high Apple has a website specifically with an FAQ on it (you can search it yourself). It also claims all over the place that Apple has high reliability...but never links anything specific to the iPod.

Seriously, spend 5 minutes on the internet with a seach for ipod failure and you will come up with a bazillion links with enough anecdotal evidence to keep you busy for weeks. It usually reads something like..."I have had my ipod for 6 months and never had a problem, now it wont charge" or "I have had my ipod 90 days and the hard drive just froze".

Even in an article praising the ipod http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,118514-page,12/article.html they say that 16% indicated ipod owners had a problem that would affect their ability to use the device, compared with 8% for similar Sony devices.

It is really simple, the iPod is no bastion of reliability.

I know you are a big MAC fan but seriously 5 minutes on Google or Excite or Yahoo and you can find TONS of failures.

nein51
01-09-07, 05:50 PM
Are you kidding me? Texting is unbelievably fast...moreso than on any keypad previously used.

The ipod nanos (my wife and I have two) are virtually indestructable whereas the ipod video does have a glitch every now and then. The build quality of both is still considered top notch, however.

Have you seen the build quality of a Powerbook? Check out the one I have on ebay! It's a little tank.Have you used it? How do you know texting is going to be simple on it?

A "glitch now and then" on what amounts to a $400 walkman is not acceptable.

A powerbook is not an iPod, like a Cavalier is not a Corvette.

SoTexBear
01-09-07, 07:56 PM
I have 3 ipods and have had no problems from 2 of them and the video only locked up twice in who knows how many hours of use. I was able to get it working again in no time.

You wanna talk about failures? I have this Dell...

turk4037
01-09-07, 08:17 PM
When the battery dies, just send it in and buy a new phone!!

BearChick
01-09-07, 08:20 PM
I am not even a Apple-drooler like so many are. But man, scrolling through that, well, they just sold me. I would easily drop Sprint next year when my contract's up and dump the Treo for that thing.

I wonder what the phone quality is like. My Treo is great for lots of stuff, but the actual phone sound quality is not that great.

nein51
01-09-07, 08:27 PM
I am not even a Apple-drooler like so many are. But man, scrolling through that, well, they just sold me. I would easily drop Sprint next year when my contract's up and dump the Treo for that thing.

I wonder what the phone quality is like. My Treo is great for lots of stuff, but the actual phone sound quality is not that great.You and 9 billion other people will do the same. It is how phone companies stay in business.

SoTexBear
01-09-07, 08:50 PM
Yeah, I had the Treo and loved it, but cingular kept screwing me. Just my luck that the iphone is being released with cingular.

With an 8% jump in AAPL stock, the market expects this phone to be "the one".

deltbear
01-09-07, 09:10 PM
This thing is gonna be awesome. I have to have it.... NOW

wantsBU2win
01-09-07, 09:11 PM
same here.....I already know what I want for my birthday :lol:

Ghostrider
01-09-07, 09:39 PM
Looks awesome...Jobs revolutionizes everything

CLBear
01-10-07, 07:42 AM
The thing does look cool as hell, but I would never use anything like that....way too many features for what I do. I just need a phone, I don't need all the do hickys on it.

And seriously what did Apple revolutionize? They basically just took all the good features that all the good smart phones have and added some of the Apple stuff on it (like ipod & their own OS) and made it their own phone. That isn't revolutionizing anything, that is just copying the good stuff and making it your own. Sound like what Bill Gates was known for.

My wife has a smart phone and other than having an ipod in it, just from what I read it does everything the iphone does (plays music, movies, games, takes pictures, makes phone calls, gets her emails, can fully surf the web on it, has blue tooth on it, etc). I don't see the difference, she is already doing everything that phone is advertising.

SoTexBear
01-10-07, 07:50 AM
True.

The Ford Taurus I had also did everything that a Bentley does.

CLBear
01-10-07, 07:55 AM
Oh good Lord, here we go...

What the heck is the difference between an email that comes on a fancy iPhone and an email that comes on my wife's phone???? They are all the same, it's text, it's an email.

booray17
01-10-07, 08:02 AM
Oh good Lord, here we go...

What the heck is the difference between an email that comes on a fancy iPhone and an email that comes on my wife's phone???? They are all the same, it's text, it's an email.
No, not really. You be able to easily read and organize the email on the iphone. Also, I really liked the "visual voicemail" feature on the iphone as well as the scrolling capabilities. The one touch phone merge for conference calls is also very cool. And from watching the demo it sounded like the quality was excellent. Plus, how many people now carry ipods and phones? Having both in one is great if that is all it did.

I agree with those that say this product is evolutionary rather than revolutionary. But it will be better than anything out there however you characterize it.

macviolinist
01-10-07, 08:28 AM
Why do I have to do your research for you?

http://www.macintouch.com/reliability/ipodfailures.html - Look at some of the reported failure rates...20%, hell even the overall 6% is disgusting but 20 freakin percent??

The failure rate of the batteries is so high Apple has a website specifically with an FAQ on it (you can search it yourself). It also claims all over the place that Apple has high reliability...but never links anything specific to the iPod.

Seriously, spend 5 minutes on the internet with a seach for ipod failure and you will come up with a bazillion links with enough anecdotal evidence to keep you busy for weeks. It usually reads something like..."I have had my ipod for 6 months and never had a problem, now it wont charge" or "I have had my ipod 90 days and the hard drive just froze".

Even in an article praising the ipod http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,118514-page,12/article.html they say that 16% indicated ipod owners had a problem that would affect their ability to use the device, compared with 8% for similar Sony devices.

It is really simple, the iPod is no bastion of reliability.

I know you are a big MAC fan but seriously 5 minutes on Google or Excite or Yahoo and you can find TONS of failures.

You don't have to do my research for me, but I'm not the one blowing a gasket to trash a product. So, I asked you to put up. Speaking of which, calm down and take a deep breath. I got to be a Mac fan by spending years as a PC technician. After as long as I've been doing this, I have a pretty good angle on which companies are reliable and honest, so please try to avoid the "fanboi" epithet.

In my experience, over 99% of all issues are caused be the user. This includes cases like the relatively famous Dell fiasco with the lattitude motherboards a few years ago, and situations where Sony, Apple, HP-C, hell, everybody but Toshiba bought a bad batch of batteries from Toshiba.

Even those issues that are obviously caused by the manufacturer are dwarfed by the number of sh!t-for-brain users who use the DVD-drive tray as a cupholder, deep-fry their laptops, and play football with their monitors.

I'm not going to spend a whole lot of time making any other defenses for the company, because in my opinion, no credible accusation has been raised. Numbers reported by end users are not relevant to me. I don't believe end users. They always think they are right, and they are almost always wrong.

I can't count the number of times people walk up to me at Common Grounds. "Hey. Are you the computer guy?" "Yes." "My iPod doesn't work." "Yes, it does. You are just too stupid to know how to use it." "Really?" "Yes. Really. Put your bong down and go buy a computer. Then go buy some music. Then put it on your iPod and it will work just fine." "Cool. Thanks." "Thank you. You owe me 20 bucks."

Every single dipsh!t user who gives their iPod a bath to clean off the screen or tries to eat it during a really bad case of the munchies gets to have a voice in these "how well does your iPod work?" polls.

Find me some data that has just a little bit of control built into it, based on actual failure rates, not anecdotal bs from end users, and you might have a point. Until then, you sound more than just a little rabid.

I'm not saying that Apple is by any means perfect, just better than everyone else. They do have their issues from time to time. Manufacturing problems are relaity for every corporation. In my experience, they get the problems fixed quickly, and I think that's all you can ask.

Jack Bauer
01-10-07, 08:53 AM
We actually had a customer who got his phone a little wet..so he put it in the microwave to dry it off...guess what happened...BOOM!!!

I'm dead serious.

turk4037
01-10-07, 08:54 AM
Very pricey. It does look very cool though. Personally I like unlocked phones so no phone company can hold me hostage. Unlocked phones, the wave of the future.

Jack Bauer
01-10-07, 09:03 AM
Very pricey. It does look very cool though. Personally I like unlocked phones so no phone company can hold me hostage. Unlocked phones, the wave of the future.

...if all you want is to make calls on a phone.

CLBear
01-10-07, 09:04 AM
No, not really. You be able to easily read and organize the email on the iphone. Also, I really liked the "visual voicemail" feature on the iphone as well as the scrolling capabilities. The one touch phone merge for conference calls is also very cool. And from watching the demo it sounded like the quality was excellent. Plus, how many people now carry ipods and phones? Having both in one is great if that is all it did.

I agree with those that say this product is evolutionary rather than revolutionary. But it will be better than anything out there however you characterize it.

I will agree with you in that it is evolutionary vs. revolutionary.

macviolinist
01-10-07, 09:47 AM
Very pricey. It does look very cool though. Personally I like unlocked phones so no phone company can hold me hostage. Unlocked phones, the wave of the future.

Again, I agree with you, Turk. Europe is all over this. But, the estimated unlocked price of this phone is about $1,200, and no one is going to pay that. Cingular's exclusive will be limited, just as it was with the ROKR. My guess is that it will last about as long as the Rev A does. By the time rev B comes out, you will be able to have it with whatever phone company you want, and companies will begin subsidizing this phone like there's no tomorrow. The caveat is that a lot of companies (Verizon is the worst about this) cripple features to make the phone conform to their UI standards, and that's what this phone is all about.

ETA: There is some confusion about this, but it appears from watching the Cingular CEO at the keynote that the price includes the cost of a two-year voice+data contract with Cingular. If that's the case, this phone is going to be the "killer app" for both companies. A lot of people will pay 500-600 bucks for a sweet phone. If this is what the guy meant, who wouldn't pay 500-600 bucks for the sweetest phone on the market plus service for 2 years?

BaylorBabe
01-10-07, 09:59 AM
I'm with CLBear, all I really need on my phone is a phone (well, text messaging and an alarm clock too). I don't need the internet, I don't need an MP3 player, I don't need a garage door opener.

macviolinist
01-10-07, 10:05 AM
There's nothing wrong with that, 'Babe. If you don't need/want those features, this phone isn't for you. I really wished that Apple had gone a two-prong route doing a low-end phone only (with a really great UI) and the high-end smart phone. But they didn't.

For those of us who want smart phones that aren't a pain (mainly, I'm talking about those dinky little QWERTY keyboards that suck for anyone who has hands bigger than a two year old), this kicks major ass.

BaylorBabe
01-10-07, 10:06 AM
I have the free phone that came with my contract with I signed with Verizon. It BSODs once a week or so but it's fine. When my "free phone upgrade" is due though I am going to get something pink. :D

eastdallasloco
01-10-07, 10:23 AM
that iphone is gonna be hella sweet but it will bust after a year like my first ipod....of course it was 2 weeks out of warranty.

tommie
01-10-07, 10:50 AM
This makes my rotary phone so outdated.
I heard youhave a rotary cell phone

macviolinist
01-10-07, 10:54 AM
I heard youhave a rotary cell phone

Qua?

http://files.myopera.com/symbianone/albums/50245/thumbs/iphone.gif_thumb.jpg

Sic Em Bears
01-10-07, 11:08 AM
Not sure I understand the clamour. It isnt a first of any sort and the ipod isnt exactly known for its build quality..

Nein, I only have had one friend have problems with theirs.....
I've had two problems with mine...Stolen.

macviolinist
01-10-07, 11:13 AM
that iphone is gonna be hella sweet but it will bust after a year like my first ipod....of course it was 2 weeks out of warranty.

If you didn't do something absurd to it, I can fix it. Probably battery, and I can fix that for 15 bucks. I'm in the Dallas area with not much to do tonight, so PM me if you want.

Sic Em Bears
01-10-07, 11:15 AM
Very pricey. It does look very cool though. Personally I like unlocked phones so no phone company can hold me hostage. Unlocked phones, the wave of the future.

Also makes phones very expensive.

Jack Bauer
01-10-07, 11:17 AM
http://money.cnn.com/2007/01/10/commentary/lewis_fortune_iphone.fortune/index.htm?postversion=2007011009

How Apple kept its iPhone secrets


Bogus prototypes, bullying the press, stifling pillow talk - all to keep iPhone under wraps. Fortune's Peter Lewis goes inside one of the year's biggest tech launches.
By Peter H. Lewis, Fortune senior editor
January 10 2007: 9:45 AM EST

SAN FRANCISCO (Fortune) -- One of the most astonishing things about the new Apple iPhone, introduced yesterday by Steve Jobs at the annual Macworld trade show, is how Apple (Charts) managed to keep it a secret for nearly two-and-a-half years of development while working with partners like Cingular, Yahoo (Charts) and Google (Charts).

The iPhone, which won't be available in the United States until June, represents a close development partnership with America's largest wireless phone company (Cingular, now a part of AT&T (Charts), has 58 million subscribers), the world's largest e-mail service (Yahoo has a quarter-billion subscribers worldwide), and the world's dominant search company. Although speculation was rampant before the introduction that Apple would introduce a phone with iPod capabilities, actual details of the device were scarce. Even some senior Apple managers whispered during the keynote that they were seeing the iPhone for the first time, along with the 4,000 other Apple followers who crammed the Moscone meeting center here. Indeed, Apple's emphasis on secrecy may have influenced Apple's choice of Cingular to be the exclusive provider for iPhone service in the United States.

Apple: Hello, iPhone
Apple, legendary for the ferocity with which it safeguards new product announcements, had extraordinary challenges in keeping the iPhone under wraps for 30 months. Besides involving Cingular, Google and Yahoo, not to mention the unnamed Asian manufacturer, the project touched nearly every department within Apple itself, Jobs said, more so than in any previous Apple creation.

No one thinks Apple went to the draconian lengths of some rivals, like Hewlett-Packard (Charts), which bugged phones, read e-mail, riffled through trash and otherwise spied on board members, employees and journalists in order to track down leaks of confidential company information. However, Apple does make it clear to employees and business partners that they will be dismissed and possibly prosecuted for leaking company secrets. Apple has also played the bully role, suing bloggers and other independent journalists for posting purported advance information about unannounced Apple products.

Secrets - along with patents - protect Apple against competitive threats from foreign companies that have become expert at instant cloning of Apple's products and designs. But secrets also create a major buzz factor. As the giant Consumer Electronics Show opened this week in Las Vegas, where hundreds of the world's biggest gadget and gizmo companies show off their newest and greatest gear, everyone was talking about the company that was not there - Apple - and speculating on what Steve Jobs had up the sleeves of his trademark black mock turtleneck shirt.

Many of the country's top technology analysts and journalists flocked to the Las Vegas airport Monday night, on the first day of CES, to be able to see Jobs reveal his secrets here Tuesday morning. Although their applications will be crucial parts of the iPhone experience, neither Yahoo nor Google saw the actual phone until shortly before the keynote, Jobs said. The software development was done without needing to provide a hardware prototype. In some cases, Apple deliberately disguised software builds, known as "stacks", to keep programmers from seeing the actual interface.

The Cingular partnership was especially complicated. Cingular had been a partner when Apple made its first foray into the phone business, providing iTunes software for the ill-fated Motorola (Charts) ROKR, unleashed in 2005. The norm in the telecom business is for carriers to dictate to phone manufacturers which features and technologies they want to offer to their subscribers, which is anathema to Apple culture. But in the case of the ROKR - which I reviewed as the STNKER - it was Motorola's meddling that drove Apple nuts. When the ROKR finally emerged, clumsy and underpowered, Jobs held it up on stage with all the enthusiasm of a man holding a dead rat by the tail. Jobs came out of the ROKR experience even more determined to maintain total control over what he called the reinvention of the telephone.

An Apple phone is no slam-dunk
However, he said, he enjoyed working with Cingular. And apparently the sentiment was mutual. Two years ago, Jobs and Cingular's chief executive, Stan Sigman, got together to forge a multiyear pact to work together on the iPhone. The Apple phone didn't even exist as a sketch at that point, but apparently Sigman trusted that Jobs and Apple would deliver on their promise to revolutionize the mobile handset. And Apple trusted Cingular not to meddle in the hardware or feature design. "They let Apple be Apple," one Apple executive said.

Cingular worked with Apple software developer on breakthrough features like visual voicemail - the ability to see a list of voicemail messages in a list and choose to listen to them in any order, instead of sequentially, as most carriers require today - while Apple focused on what it does best, the close integration of elegant hardware design with powerful but simple-to-use software. Even so, Apple didn't show Cingular the final iPhone prototype until just weeks before this week's debut. In some cases, Apple crafted bogus handset prototypes to show not just to Cingular executives, but also to Apple's own workers.

Meanwhile, Jony Ive, Apple's design guru, was refining the sleek, final design. At the Macworld keynote, with Cingular's Sigman on stage with him, Jobs hinted again that the exclusive, multiyear partnership with Cingular would yield more phones that just the two iPhone models unveiled today. (The two are basically identical: A $499 device with four gigabytes of internal memory, and a $599 version with eight gigabytes.)

In the end, Apple decided to reveal the iPhone several months ahead of its official June launch because it could not keep the secret any more. Apple has to file with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for the permits needed to operate the iPhone, and once those public filings are made, Apple has no control over the release of that information. So, Jobs said, he made the decision to have Apple tell the world about its new phone, rather than the FCC.

Pillow talk was a challenge at the other end of the spectrum. Keeping secrets from loved ones is especially hard. Those stresses were amplified by the frantic race over the past half year to get the iPhone ready for launch. As Macworld approached, dinners were missed, kids were not tucked in properly, and family plans were disrupted, especially over the holidays. And for what? "Sorry, that's classified" is not considered a satisfactory answer in many households when Mom or Dad misses the school play or the big wedding anniversary dinner.

Phil Schiller, Apple's head of marketing and one of the few Apple executives involved with the project from the start, said he had to keep the iPhone development secret even from his wife and children. When he left home for the official unveiling yesterday, Schiller said, his son asked, "Dad, can you finally tell us now what you've been working on?" Jobs paused during the keynote to acknowledge the strain and sacrifices that the past months have brought not just for the employees who kept the secrets so well, but also for their families. "We couldn't have done it without you," he said, with obvious sincerity.

Sic Em Bears
01-10-07, 11:47 AM
OK Nein MIGHT be right.

http://www.macrumors.com

Time's author as well as David Pogue had some one-on-one time with the device, and provides these additional details and observations:

- Can't download songs directly from iTunes Store
- Can't sync iPhone with a computer wirelessly.
- "Web speed was OK—not great, but OK."
- "Apple went through numerous iterations of the glass surface, trying to find one that’s not too slick or too rough, or that shows grease and fingerprints too much. "
- "It feels amazing in your hand"
- "Typing is difficult"

According to Engadget, the iPhone is not open to 3rd party development at this time. Only Apple is providing (built-in) applications for the device.

macviolinist
01-10-07, 12:00 PM
BTW, closest competitor I can find in a quick search is the Nokia n93. Clunky design, IMO, worse music/video playback time, WMP for music syncing, smaller screen, complex UI, only supports up to 4 gigs memory (ships with 50 megs, so you get to pay for the upgrade) and retails for almost $900. In exchange, you get a better (3.2 mpxl) camera and the ability to do video calls (have fun with that over current U.S. data networks). I Don't know how syncing works with SymbianOS; I've never used it. However, the iPhone runs something akin to a real, unix-based OS.

Actual desktop apps will be a reality with iPhone, and software development is going to be significantly easier on this platform than other current ones. For a great many purposes, this "phone" will replace my laptop when it comes out. Long papers will be done on the computer. Web browsing, baylorfanning, downloading music, pretty much everything including email, will be done on this. Plug an external HDD into my wireless router, and I won't care about the 8 gig storage cap.

In case you can't tell, I've been following the rumors on this very closely, and I am pleasantly surprised by what Apple has done with this. I expect my powerbook to gather a lot of dust after June.

macviolinist
01-10-07, 12:24 PM
OK Nein MIGHT be right.

http://www.macrumors.com

Time's author as well as David Pogue had some one-on-one time with the device, and provides these additional details and observations:

- Can't download songs directly from iTunes Store
- Can't sync iPhone with a computer wirelessly.
- "Web speed was OK—not great, but OK."
- "Apple went through numerous iterations of the glass surface, trying to find one that’s not too slick or too rough, or that shows grease and fingerprints too much. "
- "It feels amazing in your hand"
- "Typing is difficult"

According to Engadget, the iPhone is not open to 3rd party development at this time. Only Apple is providing (built-in) applications for the device.

I am guessing that iTunes downloading will be available after the device gets out of advanced prototype stage. As for wireless synching, there is no software functionality within iTunes to handle wireless syncing at this time.
It will still sync contacts, calendars and possibly email, via bluetooth, but no one would sync a music library over that. The device will charge via firewire or USB and sync your music at the same time.

As the web browser matures from beta, speed increases are certain. As for screen material, the Poage article ends up saying that the screen doesn't smear much.

Downloading from iTunes is certain as soon as the app is ready. You don't do that through safari, you do that through iTunes, and they haven't got that done yet.

A beta of the development platform was accidentally released in one of the developer builds of OS X last fall. The full version is expected to arrive soon, opening up apps to anyone who wants to write them.

I have no idea how the typing will turn out. It's not exactly easy on any phone I've used yet, so I'll have to wait and see for myself. Just keep in mind that this product isn't going to be for sale until June. What was shown off was only a prototype model with a lot of room for improvements. There is a lot of time between now and then, and Jobs has set the expectations extremely high. If Apple doesn't pull off what they have promised, they are looking at one of the most expensive flops of all time.

bobo
01-10-07, 02:30 PM
I never by first gen software or hardware, nor should you. let them work out the rev. 1 gremlins and then pick it up for $199 for 10 gigs in a year and a half

turk4037
01-10-07, 04:23 PM
A two year contract isn't cheap either. You pay either way, no free lunch.


Also makes phones very expensive.

turk4037
01-10-07, 04:26 PM
Exactly. I will wait for Rev B! That is the one thing that stinks about the convergence of digital technology, once everything becomes a computer you have to upgrade all the time!!


Cingular's exclusive will be limited, just as it was with the ROKR. My guess is that it will last about as long as the Rev A does. By the time rev B comes out, you will be able to have it with whatever phone company you want, and companies will begin subsidizing this phone like there's no tomorrow.

macviolinist
01-10-07, 10:16 PM
Exactly. I will wait for Rev B! That is the one thing that stinks about the convergence of digital technology, once everything becomes a computer you have to upgrade all the time!!

I'm not saying anyone should go out and buy a rev A.

I probably will, but I will expect all the problems that go along with fledgling technology. However, the price of the phone appears to include 2 years of voice + data service from Cingular. 2 years of service along with the sweetest phone ever for $699 is beyond great. You can't beat that, even by shopping smart with unlocked phones.

Sic Em Bears
01-10-07, 10:16 PM
I can't live for Rev B. I am the type that has to have the new toys.

Sic Em Bears
01-10-07, 10:24 PM
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/01/10/iphone_where_is_the_market/

Why I want the iPhone to succeed
This bling deserves better
Page: 1 2 Next >
By Andrew Orlowski ? More by this author
Published Wednesday 10th January 2007 15:26 GMT
Free White Paper Download - Data Protection Tips for SMBs
Opinion I'm glad the iPhone's is here - and I have very selfish reasons for wanting it to succeed. That's because even without the cellular telephony, it looks like something I've been wanting to buy. But it's also because after years of writing about smartphones, I've seen the established players become lazy and complacent, go down blind alleys, or standardize on horrible designs and feature sets. So the iPhone should focus minds wonderfully - it should raise the bar for everyone.
(Read how bad smartphone UIs have become here, and how the leader of the pack blew it, here)

I'm also hoping a crushing wave of shame will overcome anyone who has a Blackberry, or one of its hideous clones from HP, Motorola, Nokia or Palm. Owning one of these is like volunteering for a lobotomy - then boasting about it afterwards.
But common sense suggests it's going to be a bumpy road for Apple, and it knows it. This isn't a new experience: both the original Macintosh computer and the iPod received rave reviews on their debut but both were, a year of later, perceived to be failures. Both eventually recovered. Will Apple's new PDA?
That morning-after feeling
So Apple has set the relatively modest sales target for the iPhone of 10m by the end of 2008. This is rather less than cheerleader analysts predict - PiperJaffray last year suggested sales of between 8m and 12m Podphones in the first 12 months, based on one third of iPod owners upgrading.
That's a figure so modest it suggests Apple is (publicly and in the short-term) happy to see iPhone take its place at the top of the iPod range - with existing owners upgrading, and perhaps attracting a few new buyers. It's sensible to take a conservative line, because for all its bling, it's going to be a bumpy ride.
Unusually on the Apple boards, the iPhone is already chalking up more negatives than positives - and the reason isn't hard to find - Cingular.
And ominously, Steve Jobs is already beginning to make the same justifications he made after the launch of the Apple G4 Cube, a beautiful Apple product close to my heart. (I was an original Cube buyer, and today have two. There aren't many of us around). But great design can't save something when the price is too high.
Here's how John Markoff described the Cube-style justification in the New York Times today -

Mr. Jobs defended the higher price of the new phone in a market where prices of so-called smartphones — those combining voice calling with Internet functions — are rapidly plunging to $200 and below. He contrasted the iPhone, which has only one mechanical button on its surface, with the BlackBerry and smartphones from Motorola and Palm.
And the Cube, you'll remember had no buttons at all - just a light sensor.
Elsewhere in the Times, David Pogue struggles with the iPhone's cramped onscreen virtual keyboard. Well, I'm with Steve Jobs on this one, for aesthetic reasons. But I have a horrible feeling that a device that appears to type better and costs one third as much will still find a market.
Neither of these problems - availability or cost - is insoluble. The limited availability will be fixed when the Cingular deal expires, leaving Apple to strike deals with multiple operators and/or release an unlocked iPhone. And Moore's Law, and a low-cost "iPhone mini" will help dissipate the Cube effect.
People forget the iPod was a flop until 2003 - until iTunes on Windows and then the iPod Mini ushered in the mass market. Meanwhile Apple's feature set suggests that it's in it for the long run - but how can it get from here to there?
Here's how the iPhone could weather the inevitable disappointment in the coming year - and how Apple could find a lasting market for its new, connected PDA.
What is your iPhone for?
It's been some time since the PDA disappeared off the shelves of retail stores. IDC saw PDA shipments fall by 60 per cent last year.
But amazingly, they still sell tidy numbers, earning the manufacturers money. Even without refreshing its product line for a year, and without serious competition for almost three, Palm's PDA products netted it hundreds of millions of dollars last year. (In the most recent quarter, PDAs earned Palm $109m - the lowest for some time).
While it's hard to find a Palm owner these days, they seem supremely content with their combination of Bluetooth phone and PDA. I can see why. The Palm T|X does music pretty well, photos and documents passibly well, and it still does PIM superbly, but with one or two exceptions the software library is dusty and aging.
The iPhone is really entering the premium portion of a space that Palm should own today, if it hadn't been so badly let down by its operating system supplier. PalmSource's failure to produce a next-generation OS that anyone wanted, Cobalt (and the reasons for this are hotly contested) ensured Palm missed the SatNav boom, and its aging browser is severely limited compared to Nokia's Web and Apple's mobile Safari. It's also an area that Sony should own, too, both with its PSP and through its Sony Ericsson investment. But the phone division has been let down by the UIQ 3.0 fiasco, which turned a successful product into a mult-pronged disaster, and Sony's own reluctance to open up its PSP as a platform.
But despite all its severe limitations, reading the web on a Palm is still less noxious than reading it on a phone, and everything else is a bonus. I'm primarily in the market for a web reader, which is what I use a Palm for now - if only because the screen is larger than the competition. If the price is right, the iPhone looks like a natural replacement. On the other hand, the screen is considerably poorer than Nokia's new Linux tablet, which promises to be considerably cheaper.
Equally, the iPhone could find a niche as an ersatz SatNav. Apple seemed to think so, inviting Google and Yahoo! to show off the iPhones map and directories. With Apple's gesture UI, it made for a great demo. If one or more of these functions takes off, the iPhone will have a new lease of life.
It'll need this, because as a phone, the iPhone will face an uphill battle in Europe, where 3G communicators are supplied for free. From this perspective, the iPhone looks like an expensive iPod that locks you into a utility contract you might not want. This year's phones will run at 3.5G-speeds, (HSDPA) and several, like Nokia's N95, will feature GPS mapping built in. Stuck on 2.75G, the iPhone begins to look like a rich man's toy.
(We don't know the level of Cingular's subsidy, but it could be disguising a $1000 boondoggle).
The question then becomes, is the price right?
When it first appeared the Mac received a very similar reception to the iPhone. It was two years before the Mac found itself a market, desktop publishing, one that it helped create (thanks to the Mac UI, Postscript and the Laser Printer). Apple will be hoping the iPhone can similarly find some unexpected niche.
It deserves to be far more than a US-only phenomenon. ®
Update
And a few observations we missed. Two howlers were highlighted by Gary Wood -
Actually it's not 2.75G they are battling Nokia et al with, it's 2.5G as there is very little EDGE here (so they'll be stuck with GPRS). The battle is 3.5meg vs 56k a second ... imagine using home dial-up again after your fat ADSL pipe.
Also, is the battery removable .. a fixed battery is one thing in a music player but not in something people will want to rely upon when the last train is cancelled or late ...?
We missed that. The lack of removable battery almost killed the Treo 600, we recall - but Palm swiftly made amends.
"Does look like a nice toy though," concludes Gary. We'd agree with that. A product in search of a market, then.

billytheskink
01-10-07, 10:26 PM
http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/05/08/apple_vs_beatles/
Apple won....Apple Computers.....

http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2006/05/08/apple_vs_beatles/
Beatles say they will appeal same day.
Between dealing with Apple Corps, Microsoft, and Carl Sagan, Apple has developed a nasty legal department.

I've been an Apple die-hard for some time, but like most of Apple's fancy new gizmo's, this telephone does not interest me. I hate talking on the phone anyway, that's probably why.

I do miss the days of HyperCard, After Dark: Star Trek edition, and Pathways Into Darkness. Good thing I kept that IIsi.

bobo
01-11-07, 07:50 AM
Perhaps they need a new trademark lawyer..............

http://www.dmwmedia.com/news/2007/01/10/cisco-sues-apple-over-use-of-iphone-name