PDA

View Full Version : The Bobby Morrow Days



Baylor Dan
04-04-07, 03:02 PM
Some half century ago, Bobby Morrow was the darling of track and field fans. The San Benito/Abilene Christian sprinter won three gold medals at the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia and I think I have read that his winning time in the 100 meters was 10.5.

How many Texas high school runners have better times than that in the 100 meters this year? What is the state record in that event?

Baylor Dan
04-04-07, 03:12 PM
While wondering what FAT means, I didn't see this earlier thread:

Rynell Parson has run a FAT 10.32

GarlandBear84
04-04-07, 03:12 PM
Some half century ago, Bobby Morrow was the darling of track and field fans. The San Benito/Abilene Christian sprinter won three gold medals at the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia and I think I have read that his winning time in the 100 meters was 10.5.

How many Texas high school runners have better times than that in the 100 meters this year? What is the state record in that event?

Derrick Florence of Galveston Ball holds the state record of 10.13 set in 1986. The top 10 all-time in Texas are all at 10.28 or under. This year only 2 are lower than 10.50. Soph Rynell Parson ran 10.32 and DJ Monroe ran 10.48.

GarlandBear84
04-04-07, 03:13 PM
While wondering what FAT means, I didn't see this earlier thread:

Rynell Parson has run a FAT 10.32

Fully Automatic Timing. It means a timing system records the times instead of a hand-held stopwatch.

GarlandBear84
04-04-07, 03:18 PM
To educate the youngsters and me (since I wasn't born then):
Bobby Joe Morrow was born in Harlingen, Texas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlingen%2C_Texas) and raised in a farm in San Benito, Texas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Benito%2C_Texas). Before becoming a sprinter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sprints), Morrow played American football (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_football) for San Benito High School. Morrow also was a sprinter at Abilene Christian University (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abilene_Christian_University).
Morrow, who had won the 1955 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1955) AAU (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amateur_Athletic_Union) 100 yd (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yard) title, had his most successful season in 1956 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1956), which led to his choice by Sports Illustrated (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sports_Illustrated) as "Sportsman of the Year (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sportsman_of_the_Year)." Morrow won the sprint double in the national college championships and retained his AAU title. Late in the season, Morrow went to Melbourne (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1956_Summer_Olympics) as a leader of the American sprint team. He came back with three gold medals.
First, Morrow was victorious in the 100 m (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metre). Next, he led an American sweep of the medals in the 200 m, equalling the Olympic Record as well. As an anchorman for the 4 x 100 m relay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relay_race) team, he won his third gold, setting a World Record (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Record) as well.
After the Olympics, Morrow's success on a national level continued, but he retired in 1958 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1958). He made a short comeback before the 1960 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1960) Olympics, but he failed to qualify for the Olympic team.
After his retirement, Bobby Joe Morrow became a farmer and woodworker.

GarlandBear84
04-04-07, 03:47 PM
Dan, Morrow's world record time set on June 29, 1956 was 10.2 and later that year he set the world record in the 200 at 20.6. Today those records are 9.77 and 19.32, but the track surface and running shoes are better.

Pale Rider
04-04-07, 05:10 PM
Dan, Morrow's world record time set on June 29, 1956 was 10.2 and later that year he set the world record in the 200 at 20.6. Today those records are 9.77 and 19.32, but the track surface and running shoes are better.

Not to mention "starting blocks." I think Morrow used the kind of blocks that each individual runner had to punch down in the surface with a mallet. Ancient tools compared to what is used today. Please don't ask me how I know. :( :uhoh: :blush:

Juncbear
04-04-07, 08:52 PM
Back in the days of Bobby Morrow, Abilene Christian University was known as ACC, Abilene Christian College. ACC had a very good and balanced track and field team. Their 440 yard relay team consited of Morrow, Woodie Woodhouse, a world class sprinter in his own right, Don Beard, a hurdler from Thorndale, TX and the name of the 4th member I do not recall. It seams like the same 4 also ran the 880 yard relay too. Woodhouse became a prominent sprinter after Morrow left ACC. In addition to Morrow, another Texan also stared in the Melbourne Olympics. His name was Eddie Southern who was a hurdler and 400 meter runner or 400 meter hurdler. Southern was either in between his senior year at Dallas Sunset High and his freshman year at the University of Texas in Austin or in between his freshman year and sophmore year at UT. I was very much in awe of these guys. Oliver Jackson was the name of the ACC Track and Field coach. Great coach and recruiter.
It has been a real thrill tonight for me to re-live that time period. Ah, those were the days my friends - we thought they would never end.

bulaw63
04-04-07, 09:24 PM
Abilene High also had some awesome football teams during that period. Back to back state champions in '55 and '56, as I recall, but I show my age.

Roger Bannister broke the four minute mile just a couple of years earlier.

Those were the days. They were all bigger than life.

LordByron
04-04-07, 10:48 PM
Back in the days of Bobby Morrow, Abilene Christian University wasw known as ACC, Abilene Christian College. ACC had a very good and balanced track and field team. Their 440 yard relay team consited of Morrow, Woodie Woodhouse, a world class sprinter in his own right, Don Beard, a hurdler from Thorndale, TX and the name of the 4th member I do not recall. It seams like the same 4 also ran the 880 yard relay too. Woodhouse became a prominent sprinter after Morrow left ACC. In addition to Morrow, another Texan also stared in the Melbourne Olympics. His name was Eddie Southern who was a hurdler and 400 meter runner or 400 meter hurdler. Southern was either in between his senior year at Dallas Sunset High and his freshman year at the University of Texas in Austin or in between his freshman year and sophmore year at UT. I was very much in awe of these guys. Oliver Jackson was the name of the ACC Track and Field coach. Great coach and recruiter.
It has been a real thrill tonight for me to re-live that time period. Ah, those were the days my friends we thought they would never end.Amen, Juncbear. And you could listen to them on the radio.

LordByron
04-04-07, 10:53 PM
Abilene High also had some awesome football teams during that period. Back to back state champions in '55 and '56, as I recall, but I show my age.

Roger Bannister broke the four minute mile just a couple of years earlier.

Those were the days. They were all bigger than life.That 1956 Abilene HS team is generally considered the best Texas high school team of all time. They played the Waco Tigers in the fall of 1956 and beat them something like 48 - 7. Abilene was outweighed about 30 pounds per man. Genn Gregory was the star. The thing I remember about that game was, after the game, I couldn't recall seeing a Tiger runner fall forward the entire game.

Baylor Dan
04-05-07, 08:42 AM
Dan, Morrow's world record time set on June 29, 1956 was 10.2.But wasn't his Olympic winning time 10.5?

What was Morrow's best time in the 100 yard dash? Was Mel Patton's record 9.3 in that event ever broken?

Am I the only one who liked it better when the races were measured in yards rather than meters?

GarlandBear84
04-05-07, 09:36 AM
But wasn't his Olympic winning time 10.5?

What was Morrow's best time in the 100 yard dash? Was Mel Patton's record 9.3 in that event ever broken?

Am I the only one who liked it better when the races were measured in yards rather than meters?

I tried to find his winning time, but could only find a list of the medalists. Someone else will have to answer your other questions. The metric system doesn't bother me too much on races, but the field events are still hard for me to convert mentally because I'm so used to feet.

Juncbear
04-05-07, 10:15 AM
But wasn't his Olympic winning time 10.5?

What was Morrow's best time in the 100 yard dash? Was Mel Patton's record 9.3 in that event ever broken?

Am I the only one who liked it better when the races were measured in yards rather than meters?

The link listed below indicates that Morrow's winning 100 meter time was 10.62 seconds and his winning 200 meter time was 20.75.

Click on the link below to see the various times.

Link - http://www.hickoksports.com/history/ol1956.shtml#mtandf

Stranger
04-05-07, 11:21 AM
Bobby Morrow was the keynote speaker at our chamber of commerce banquet in 1960. I carried the American flag in my scout uniform that night as an eleven-year old. He autographed my program and I still have it. . . . .
yeah, those were the days.

Pale Rider
04-05-07, 12:04 PM
Am I the only one who liked it better when the races were measured in yards rather than meters?Yep it is what I grew up running. I still like the mile run rather than the 1500 meters.

Juncbear
04-05-07, 03:25 PM
But wasn't his Olympic winning time 10.5?

What was Morrow's best time in the 100 yard dash? Was Mel Patton's record 9.3 in that event ever broken?

Am I the only one who liked it better when the races were measured in yards rather than meters?

Baylor Dan, I would have to say that Morrow's best time in the 100 yard dash was 9.3 as he tied the world record 3 times. Morrow had an amazing record in winning 80 out of 88 times that he officially ran the 100 yard dash. (Mel Patton set the 100 yard world record in 1948 and it was tied 10 times before it was broken. One source says it was broken in 1961 and another source says that Bullet Bob Hayes set the WR of 9.2 in 1962. That stood until the next year when Hayes ran a 9.1. Ivory Crockett set the WR of 9.0 in 1974 and Houston Mactear, as a high schooler, ran a 9.0 earlier but it was not recognized as a world record because it was hand timed.) Morrow was born in 1935 and retired in 1958 at the old age of 23. Back then sprinters in particular were considered old at age 21 to 22. I really wonder what Morrow could have accomplished if he had the use of today's training techniques, equipment (particularly shoes and starting blocks) and track surfaces.